The Island Gallery
milo mirabelli

Milo Mirabelliís career in wood sculpture and woodturning started out of a desire to create art and be productive after several back injuries and surgeries left him unable to work in his former capacity. The overwhelming desire to create is what keeps him going.

The process of finding the right wood takes considerable time and thought, selecting pieces out of burn piles and other sources that have been pushed aside as "unusable". Milo has to imagine what is hidden under the bark, and has learned by looking at the outside that you never know the true beauty until the tree is cut; even then, careful consideration is given to what each piece can become. A great deal depends on just how the tree is cut as to whether he can manipulate the pattern into a vessel or container, platter or wall sculpture.

The process of cutting, turning, drying, and re-turning can take months. Then the finishing takes place, which can take up to two weeks, depending on how many coats are required for the look he desires. The wood is transformed into a beautiful living piece of art when the oil is applied. It is truly amazing to see the beauty that has come out of a log that was discarded! More recently, Milo began using a metal lathe and mill to bring a new edge to his creative desires.

Milo has exhibited throughout the Northwest and his work is part of numerous private and public collections.

I have always had a great love for beautiful woods but until I became involved with woodturning I didnít realize how much beauty could be found in a typical pile of firewood. Because of what may lie beneath the bark, I keep an open mind when turning and allow the wood to have a say in its final outcome. By working in this manner I find that my designs are more fluid by nature, sometimes sensuous and sometimes austere, but always allowing the wood to have a voice in the process. I approach my designs with enthusiasm and wonder, always taking it a little further and asking "what if?"




Milo Mirabelli